Château de l'Oiselinière Muscadet Sèvre et Maine

Muscadet Sèvre et Maine, Loire Valley, France

Past vintages: 2009 |
Price: $13.00
Style: White

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More about Château de l'Oiselinière

At Oiselinière vines have been grown for centuries--in fact leases written on parchment dated 1337, 1471,1505, 1546 have been preserved. On the parchment dated from 1635 in particular, there is the first mention of Muscadet. It is the first known lease today and is written as follows: “Jean de Goulet de la Fosse de Nantes leases to several private individuals from the Parish of Gorges, a piece of land consisting of 78 plots, known as “Les Grands Gâts” dependent on the land of the Oiselinière in order to plant white Muscadet vines.” The vineyards of Château de l’Oiselinière are grown on the ridges and the plateau which look over the right bank of the Sèvre, facing south-westwards. The property has a total surface of 43 hectares planted with Muscadet vine-plants(still termed Melon de Bourgogne). The average age of the vines is 40 years, with certain plots more than 70 years. These vines yields very mature, concentrated grapes from which are derived the distinctive qualities of the Oiselinière wines.

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Château du Coing de St. Fiacre
The "terrior" of the Chateau du Coing is one of the oldest in the Nantes region. Indeed, the vineyard was cultivated as early as the Roman period. The current property dates from the 15th century. I nthe 18th Century, Jean du Coing and Isabelle Pantin enjoyed receiving guests at the castle located at the confluence of the Sevre and Maine rivers, to the delight of the local aristocracy. From Nantes to Saint-Fiacre, the Sevre nantaise and the Maine have seduced many guests. The Maine river at Chateau du "Coin" remains the witness to a privileged welcome. The Vendeen civil wars put an end to this marvelous period. The Chateau du Coing was destroyed and burnt and Jean du Coing and Isabelle Pantin guillotined. The family escaped the massacre and emigrated to America where the descendants of Pierre du Coing, brother of Jean du Coing, are still living.
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